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T-Mobile’s ‘Rough and Crude’ Legere Goes Off on AT&T, Verizon
By Craig Galbraith
June 19, 2014 - News

**Editor's Note: Which is America's top wireless network? Click here to see what we discovered.**

T-Mobile CEO John Legere is no stranger to controversy. The outspoken boss at the up-and-coming Magenta Network makes it a habit of railing against larger rivals AT&T and Verizon on his Twitter feed, but this time the harsh words were spewed forth at a media event.

T-Mobile's John Legere“These high and mighty duopolists that are raping you for every penny you have … the f***ers hate you," Legere said.

The rants have been fast and furious this week. Upon learning that Amazon had chosen AT&T to be the exclusive U.S. carrier for its new “Fire" smartphone, Legere took to Twitter, saying, “Exclusivity sucks for customers. Exclusivity on AT&T sucks for the industry. Just sayin.’"

All of this comes as rumors swirl about a merger. It’s widely anticipated that Sprint will announce a $32 billion agreement to buy T-Mobile sometime within the next few weeks. Legere, riding T-Mobile’s success as of late – notably 1.3 million new customers in the first quarter – is widely considered to be the front-runner to lead the combined company as chief executive.

“I may be a little rough and crude," Legere told Business Insider earlier this year, “but I’m much more like my customers and my employees than I am an executive."

Follow senior online managing editor @Craig_Galbraith on Twitter.

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