Jury: Samsung’s iPhone Patent Infringements Not Worth Billions

By Craig Galbraith Comments
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A federal jury says Samsung infringed on a pair of patents, but not two others that Apple had in place for its iconic iPhone.

The case ended late Friday with a $120 million verdict for Apple, but that was far less than the $2.2 billion the Silicon Valley giant had been seeking from Samsung.

"This amount is less than 10% of the amount Apple requested and probably doesn't surpass by too much the amount Apple spent litigating this case," Brian Love, assistant professor at Santa Clara University School of Law, told the Wall Street Journal. "Apple launched this litigation campaign years ago with aspirations of slowing the meteoric rise of Android phone manufacturers. It has so far failed to do so, and this case won't get it any closer."

The jury agreed that some Samsung smartphones violated Apple’s data-tapping feature, which allows you to dial a phone number that someone sends you in an email simply by touching it. Other Samsung devices were found in violation of the patent that involves how you slide your finger across the screen to unlock the device.

Apple is also being awarded damages for infringement of its auto-complete patent, which gives you suggestions on how to finish a word as you are typing it. The judge in the case asked the jury to reconsider that verdict as it applies to one Samsung phone because the group gave no damages in that specific case. They’ll be back in the deliberation room on Monday.

The jury said no to Apple’s request for relief on a patent involving synchronizing data and another regarding the use of voice-activated searches, such as the way one uses Apple’s Siri.

Samsung, with its bevy of smartphones based on Google's Android operating system, is far and away the global leader in shipments, while Apple's iPhone is the most popular seller. Both companies, however, have started to lose market share as less-expensive Chinese-manufactured devices gain in popularity.

Follow senior online managing editor @Craig_Galbraith on Twitter.

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