iPhone 6: Potential Early Release Date, Larger Screen Predicted

By Daniel Santa Cruz Comments
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**Editor's Note: Click here  for our list of September's hottest selling smartphones to see how the iPhone fared against the competition, or here for our top 10 list of best smartphones in 2013 (so far).**

The likelihood that Apple will release an iPhone with a larger screen next year is increasing – that is, if the growing number of big-screen forecasts mean anything.

It's only been a little more than a month since the Silicon Valley giant started selling the iPhone 5s and 5c, but that isn't stopping the prognosticators from looking into their crystal balls to determine what's next from Apple.

A Japanese site, translated by BGR, says that Apple hasn't made a final decision on screen size for the iPhone 6 – assuming that's what it will be called – but five inches seems like the best bet. The article goes on to say that the device will have a 1080p retina display. Not a lot else to go on.

Earlier this week, Gene Munster, an analyst with Piper Jaffray, told investors that he, too, expects an upgrade from the existing four-inch display on the 5s. But sorry if you're looking for an earlier-than-expected release. Munster says to anticipate the iPhone 6 to go on sale in Sept. 2014.

For those of you who wish that Apple will break its tradition of an annual iPhone announcement, there is hope.

Cantor Fitzgerald analyst Brian White recently turned to his sources in Apple's Asian supply chain, who told him that the company could get back on track with its early summer iPhone announcements next year – perhaps even earlier. (It used to be common for Apple to introduce its iPhones at its Worldwide Developers Conference in June.) White reported a potential release date of anywhere from April to September.

Meantime, as happens with many new iPhone releases, Apple is doing a little bit of damage control. The company acknowledged to the New York Times this week that some of the new handsets – which should have longer battery life than their predecessors – don't.

“We recently discovered a manufacturing issue affecting a very limited number of iPhone 5S devices that could cause the battery to take longer to charge or result in reduced battery life,” an Apple spokeswoman told the Times. “We are reaching out to customers with affected phones and will provide them with a replacement phone.”

The iPhone 5s defect affects a few thousand handsets.

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